Sinn Fein Good Friday Agreement

The agreement reached was that Northern Ireland was part of the United Kingdom and would remain so until a majority of the population of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland wanted something else. Should this happen, the UK and Irish governments will be required to “have a binding commitment” to implement this decision. The two main political parties in the deal were the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), led by David Trimble, and the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) led by John Hume. The two leaders together won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1998. The other parties involved in a deal were Sinn Féin, the Alliance Party and the Progressive Unionist Party. The Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), which later became the largest unionist party, did not support the deal. It left the talks when Sinn Féin and loyalist parties joined because republican and loyalist paramilitary weapons had not been downgraded. “The agreement is concluded and the commitment is to advance the political path. In addition to the number of signatories,[note 1] Stefan Wolff notes the following similarities and differences between the issues addressed in the two agreements:[28] The participants in the agreement consisted of two sovereign states (the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland) with armed and police forces involved in the riots. Two political parties, Sinn Féin and the Progressive Unionist Party (PUP), were linked to paramilitary organisations: the Commissional Irish Republican Army (IRA) and the Ulster Volunteer Force (EIE). The Ulster Democratic Party (UDP), together with the Ulster Defence Association (UDA), had withdrawn from the talks three months earlier.

“These people make deals, but before the ink is dry, they`ve already thrown it away. It brings to any agreement you have made with the British Government and to any guarantee with the Irish Government that it is not worth the paper on which it is written. Issues of sovereignty, civil and cultural rights, weapons dismantling, demilitarization, justice and police work were at the heart of the agreement. If a vote on Irish unification results in a positive outcome, the agreement states that “it will be a binding commitment for both governments to introduce and support laws in their respective parliaments to give effect to this wish.” Political parties in Northern Ireland, which endorsed the agreement, were also invited to consider the creation of an independent advisory forum, with members of civil society with expertise in social, cultural, economic and other matters, and appointed by both administrations. . . .